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A Legacy of Tramp Art
by Clifford A. Wallach



This book presents over 600 historical images and introduces newly discovered artists of tramp art. Made from society’s discards, primarily wooden cigar boxes and wooden crates, tramp art is the story of the common man, unschooled in the arts, taking a simple tool to carve a legacy from the heart for all to enjoy and celebrate.
                                   
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A Little World Under the Christmas Tree
by Bob Brooke

 

The Germans began the tradition of putting little houses under their Christmas trees. They called it a "putz." In the early part of the 20th Century, many Americans created their own Christmas villages under their trees. To meet the need, German toy manufacturers began to produce small, inexpensive, cardboard houses covered with bits of mica to represent snow. The Dolly Toy Company of Chilicothe, Ohio, started making these houses in the mid-1930s. They’re known as "printies" because the details were printed on them. Makers used wire brushes for evergreen trees and at first pink tissue and later colored cellophane for the windows since the houses were meant to be lit from inside.

After World War II, Japan began producing cheaper Christmas houses. These are the ones most found at flea markets and antique malls today. While individual Japanese examples can begin as low as $4-6, a complete boxed set of eight German ones can sell for as high as $795.


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How to Recognize and Refinish Antiques for Pleasure and Profit

Book: How to Recognizing and Refinishing Antiques for Pleasure and Profit
Have you ever bought an antique or collectible that was less than perfect and needed some TLC? Bob's new book offers tips and step-by- step instructions for simple maintenance and restoration of common antiques.

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